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  • Struggle in PPC 2

    #2: PPC Suicide Strike – How Most Affiliates Unknowingly Demolish a Winning Affiliate Campaign

    Now I first talked about how you MUST to go wide (bid on broad keywords) before you go deep.

    But there’s another pitfall I didn’t mention that can kill your PPC efforts dead in their tracks ? even if you have an excellent keyword list, and you go wide, bidding on all the broad keywords right from the get go.


    Before I tell you what this major pitfall is, let me paint a scenario for you that I’m sure is all too familiar:

    Jack is launching a new affiliate offer on AdWords. He has really done his research and compiled a nice broad keyword list to bid on.

    Jack launches his ad campaign bidding $0.20/click on all his keywords to start with. He lets his ad campaign run for several days.

    In those several days, he gets 500 clicks on his ads, and ends up making four sales at $20 per sale and $80 in commission.

    However, Jack spent (500 clicks)×$0.20/click = $100. So he has a net loss of $20.

    So now Jack figures: “Great, I found a winner! Now let me lower my bid to $0.10/click, so then for every 500 clicks, or $50 I spend I make $80 in commission. A $30 net profit!”

    Jack lowers his bids to $0.10/click, and he notices his traffic drops considerably. He thinks “Okay, so I have a fraction of the traffic I used to get, no big deal, at least I’m profitable at $0.10/click.”

    After waiting almost two weeks, Jack notices he has 500 clicks on his campaign but no sales! He thinks “This is bad, but it’s probably just a bad week! Damn! I’ll let it run for another 500 clicks.”

    After another 500 clicks Jack still has no sales on his campaign. At this point it’s been weeks since he started the campaign, and in frustration he figures “Things just fizzled out!”

    So what happened to Jack’s campaign?

    1. When Jack first started his campaign, he bid $0.20/click, and the ads for his top converting keywords were on the first page of the Google search results. That’s where he got his four sales from.

    2. By bidding all of his keywords down to $0.10/click, he pushed the ads for his top converting keywords onto the second page of Google search results. So for the next 500-1000 clicks, he got barely any clicks on these high converting keywords, and as a result he made ZERO sales!

    Here’s a simple fact: High converting keywords have a higher cost per click, and since they convert better (make more sales) there is more competition for these keywords.

    “Great, I get it! Now how do I avoid making this VERY costly mistake?”

    Fortunately, I’ve developed a smart way to ensure that your high converting keywords get good traffic WITHOUT bleeding red for weeks.

    Here’s the idea: Start your bids at $0.20/click (or whatever makes sense) across the board when you start your ad campaign.

    After a day or two, look at your ad positions, and you’ll notice some of your ads show up in the first ad position in Google search results, and for others your ads will be in position 12 or higher.

    You want all your ads on the first page of Google, right? Preferably you want your ads between ad positions thee and eight.

    You see, positions one and two tend to get too many ‘click happy’ visitors who click on the first thing they see no matter what. And if you’re past position eight, you’ll end up on the second page of Google, and will get very few clicks.

    Here’s what you do next:

    1. Go into AdWords Editor, make sure you have campaign statistics showing. (AdWords Editor is a FREE desktop tool provided by Google to manage your AdWords Campaigns, you can download it here: http://www.google.com/intl/en/AdWordseditor/).

    2. Go to ‘Ad Groups’ tab for your campaign.

    3. Then Click on the ‘View’ drop down box above the tabs, and select ‘Create or Set Custom View.”

    4. Filter your data by ‘Performance Statistics’, it’s at the very bottom.

    5. Set ‘Avg Pos’ greater than position eight. Then you’ll see all your adgroups with ads that are greater than position eight. 6. Select all of these adgroups, and increase the max CPC (Cost Per Click, it’s in the box below) by 30% (more or less depending on the positions of your ads).

    Repeat the above steps, except this time set your filter to show all ads in positions less than three, and then decrease the CPC by 30%.

    You’ll see all your adgroups with ads that are greater than position eight. 6. Select all of these adgroups, and increase the max CPC (Cost Per Click, it’s in the box below) by 30% (more or less depending on the positions of your ads).

    Repeat the above steps, except this time set your filter to show all ads in positions less than three, and then decrease the CPC by 30%.

    By adjusting your bids by ad position, you’ll push all your ads into the sweet spot, positions three through eight. Now you can let your campaign run without losing your shirt, and rest assured your high converting keywords are getting good traffic. So you can have your cake AND eat it!

    Don’t be suckered into thinking your campaign mysteriously fizzled out after making sales for two days. Chances are you did something seriously wrong to make that happen.

    At this point if you’re a newbie, you may be thinking….

    Source : any PPC experts

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